Publishing contract for HEADCASE secured!

Hello-

We have secured a publishing contract with Oxford University Press USA. We will be working with our editor at OUP to get the book published. We need to gather contributor agreements, edit each individual contribution, and meet all requirements for the submission of our final manuscript and ancillary materials by March 2018.

The projected publication date is late 2018 or early 2019. We believe HEADCASE will be groundbreaking in content and presentation and will generate many useful conversations both within LGBTQ communities and in others quarters as well (and lots of press coverage, too).

If you have questions, comments, want to write about HEADCASE, or otherwise get in touch with us, please email us at headcasesubmissions [at] gmail [dot]com.

Thanks for all the support from the many and various corners throughout the past two+ years and in the next year as well.

In Solidarity,

Teresa Theophano, LMSW and Stephanie Schroeder, JD, Editors

CALL FOR CLINICAL CONTRIBUTIONS

UPDATE: MARCH 29, 2016

Per the below, HEADCASE continues to seek clinical contributions on the topic of LGBTQ mental health. We are extending the deadline for queries to April 15, 2016, and at this time, we are prioritizing submissions related to the following specific topics:

  • Consumer advocacy and activism; the psychiatric survivors movement and radical madness
  • Intersectionality: race and ethnicity, youth and geriatric LGBTQ mental health, dis/ability, issues of marginalization
  • Interventions, particularly regarding psychopharmacology and peer support
  • Approaches to de-pathologizing trans and gender non-conforming identities
  • Barriers to access: economic, cultural, geographic
  • The failure of some mental health graduate and training programs to consider clinicians’ own experiences of first-hand trauma as opposed to vicarious trauma in client work, and whether “trigger warnings” should be in effect in training settings;
  • The lack of social and professional acceptance of clinicians who are themselves in recovery or remission from mental illness, setting up an “us v. them” dynamic with consumers/peers–mental health professionals such as Kay Redfield Jamison, Marsha Linehan, and Elyn Saks who have disclosed in their memoirs being exceptions

Clinicians who are of color, of transgender experience, and/or are providing services to LGBTQ women and TGNC clients are particularly encouraged to submit queries.

The Project

HEADCASE: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Writers and Artists on Mental Illness was originally conceived as an anthology of curated personal pieces that include essays, poems, illustrations, and photographs by writers and artists both established and new. The book aimed to explore the themes of mental health, mental illness, and experiences of the mental health care systems by members of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) communities.

We are currently expanding the anthology to include clinical perspectives as we begin working with an academic publisher. The finished book will appeal to both lay readers and mental health professionals. While we are at capacity for submissions from peers, consumers, and other individuals with lived experience, at this time we do seek contributors from LGBTQ communities who possess clinical expertise and professional credentials to submit content relevant to the anthology. Community members who fall into both categories are particularly encouraged to submit queries.

The Issues

As the literature states, gay affirmative therapy has been defined as “the integration of knowledge and awareness by the therapist of the unique development and cultural aspect of LGBT individuals, the therapist’s own self-knowledge, and the translation of this knowledge and awareness into effective and helpful therapy skills at all stages of the therapeutic process” (Bieschke, Perez et al, 2007). But “limited empirical information exist on what constitutes effective psychotherapy for LGB individuals…Even less empirical research exists on validated interventions pertaining to issues such as coming out that are unique to this sexual minority population,” (Johnson, 2012) let alone to individuals who are both LGBQ and trans/gender non-conforming.

As Johnson goes on to ask, “Without an identified theoretical framework or operationalized definitions for specific interventions, it appears that gay affirmative therapy is better defined as a therapeutic approach rather than a specific psychotherapy…should [LGBTQ-affirmative therapy] be developed as a specific, validated intervention for this unique population?”

We are interested in learning clinicians’ take on this issue in working with LGBTQ clients, especially those with multiple marginalized identities.

Other important topics clinical contributors may address:

  • The challenges LGBTQ practitioners have encountered in the course of their own clinical training, such as when training programs are not themselves LGBTQ-affirmative or culturally competent;
  • The failure of some mental health graduate and training programs to consider clinicians’ own experiences of first-hand trauma as opposed to vicarious trauma in client work, and whether “trigger warnings” should be in effect in training settings;
  • The lack of social and professional acceptance of clinicians who are themselves in recovery or remission from mental illness, setting up an “us v. them” dynamic with consumers/peers–mental health professionals such as Kay Redfield Jamison, Marsha Linehan, and Elyn Saks who have disclosed in their memoirs being exceptions;
  • The dynamics of working within our own communities of LGBTQ individuals, as well as with clients who are not members of this population and may express homophobic/transphobic sentiment.

The call

Other concepts the book will address from a clinical perspective can include:

  • Terminology
  • Prevalence and diagnosis of mental illness–especially depression, anxiety, and PTSD–in LGBTQ populations
  • Stigma for LGBTQ consumers and issues of self-disclosure
  • Suicide, suicide prevention, and survivors of suicide loss in queer and trans populations
  • Interventions: psychotherapeutic, psychopharmacological, and peer support
  • Consumer advocacy and activism; the psychiatric survivors movement and radical madness
  • Dating & intimate relationships; parenting & mental illness
  • Intersectionality: race and ethnicity, youth and geriatric LGBTQ mental health, dis/ability, issues of marginalization
  • Barriers to access: economic, cultural, geographic
  • Dual diagnosis/MICA/Double Trouble among LGBTQ individuals
  • Approaches to de-pathologizing trans and gender non-conforming identities
  • Intersections of health and mental health
  • Violence against LGBTQ people with mental illness
  • Arts & activism
  • A queer patients’ bill of rights

We invite inquiries from practitioners and researchers with diverse clinical perspectives who would like to contribute relevant pieces for the anthology. We seek articles written in an accessible style, even if citing research. We recommend a conversational style over an academic tone when writing for our crossover audience. Word count limit is 5000 and all queries/proposals are due by April 1, 2016. Deadline for finished pieces TBD.

Please email inquiries, including specific story ideas and angles along with a proposed timeline, to headcasesubmissions@gmail.com and also include a brief biography.

We look forward to hearing from you!

~Teresa Theophano, LMSW and Stephanie Schroeder, JD

 

About us

Teresa Theophano is a New York State-licensed social worker and freelance writer/editor. She currently helps oversee case management services at Services and Advocacy for GLBT Elders (SAGE). Teresa co-launched the New York City Queer Mental Health Initiative (QMHI), an LGBTQ mental health peer support network in collaboration with the Brooklyn Community Pride Center, in July 2014. Since graduating from Hunter College School of Social Work with an MSW the same year that her book Queer Quotes (Beacon, 2004) was published, she has worked and volunteered with LGBTQ communities at numerous organizations including Rainbow Heights Club, Trinity Place Shelter (at which she is currently a member of the board of directors), the Queer Detainee Empowerment Project, and Queers for Economic Justice. Additionally, she has taught as an adjunct professor at the New York City College of Technology–part of the City University of New York–and is currently enrolled in clinical coursework at NYU and the University of Buffalo. Teresa has been involved in social justice movements for decades and is interested in further exploring radical and holistic approaches to mental health. She has contributed to websites including xojane.com and glbtq.com and to anthologies including The Queer Encyclopedia of the Visual Arts and The Queer Encyclopedia of Music, Dance, and Theatre, and has read short works at various literary events in New York City.

Stephanie Schroeder is a freelance writer based in Brooklyn, NY. She has written for The Guardian, Curve Magazine, Passport Magazine, Brooklyn Paper, About.com, Station-to-Station.com, Life of The Law, Lambda Literary Review, and blogs about mental illness/mental health. Her work has been anthologized in the classic queer anthology That’s Revolting: Queer Strategies for Resisting Assimilation, as well as Here Come the Brides: Reflections on Lesbian Love and Marriage, and Easy to Love, But Hard to Live With: Real People, Invisible Disabilities, True Stories. She is an activist working toward social and economic justice within an anti-racist framework and in the context of sexual and gender liberation. Stephanie graduated from Hunter College with a BA in communications and holds a JD from New York Law School. She has a special interest in creativity and mental illnesses as well as therapeutic jurisprudence. She is the author of the memoir Beautiful Wreck: Sex, Lies & Suicide (Creative Evolution, 2012).

 

ALL Calls for Submissions CLOSED

Hello Everyone,

We are closing our renewed call for submissions.

We are overwhelmed by the amazing and passionate responses and wellspring of interest and support for HEADCASE.

Our desks are piled high with several dozen texts to review and we ask that folks hold all further queries and/or submissions.

Thanks again to all who responded, we are very grateful and will definitely be in touch!

Take good care – and with all best wishes,

Stephanie & Teresa

Reopening call: seeking male-identified, MOC, and TGNC writers and artists

Happy summer, everyone!

Stephanie and I have made lots of progress in compiling an eclectic manuscript, and at this time we are interested in seeing more submissions from male-identified, masculine-of-center, gender non-conforming and trans writers and artists. We are thrilled to have gotten so many wonderful submissions from female-identified folks, and we’d like an even more diverse lineup of contributions. The anthology will remain open to submissions, as outlined above, until we post on this blog that this new call is closed.

If you are interested in submitting work, PLEASE READ our original call for submissions, detailed in the below post from January 22nd.

Please email inquiries and submissions to: headcasesubmissions@gmail.com, and include a brief biography so we get a sense of who you are and where your work has appeared. (It’s okay if you are looking to get published for the first time, too!)

Please be sure to include your name and contact info on any attachments you send.

Thanks! –Teresa

Headcase Call for Submissions Is Closed (at least for now!)

Hello wonderful people,

Thank you for your many fantastic queries and submissions and for your support of this project! We have quite a long shortlist (ah, the irony) at this point and while we continue to shop the proposal around to publishers, as of today we are putting the call for submissions on indefinite hiatus. If we do reopen it, which remains to be seen pending publisher approval of the current shortlist, it will be announced here on this page, so do check back.

Thanks again, and take good care!

Teresa and Stephanie

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS*

HEADCASE_RUST

HEADCASE: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Writers & Artists on Mental Illness

5,000 word count limit

Editors

Teresa Theophano is a New York State-licensed social worker and freelance writer/editor. She is currently employed at Services and Advocacy for GLBT Elders (SAGE), providing case management services primarily to the homebound elderly. She helped launch the New York City Queer Mental Health Initiative (QMHI), an LGBTQ mental health peer support network in collaboration with the Brooklyn Community Pride Center, in July 2014. Since graduating from Hunter College School of Social Work with an MSW the same year that her book Queer Quotes (Beacon, 2004) was published, she has worked and volunteered with LGBTQ communities at numerous organizations including Rainbow Heights Club, Trinity Place Shelter, and Queers for Economic Justice. Additionally, she has taught as an adjunct professor at the New York City College of Technology–part of the City University of New York–and completed a year-long training program at the Institute for Integrative Nutrition as well as graduate courses in public health. Teresa has been involved in social justice movements for decades and is interested in further exploring radical and holistic approaches to mental health. She has contributed to websites including xojane.com, glbtq.com, and queermentalhealth.org and to anthologies including The Queer Encyclopedia of the Visual Arts and The Queer Encyclopedia of Music, Dance, and Theatre, and has read short works at various literary events in New York City.

Stephanie Schroeder is a freelance writer based in Brooklyn, NY. She has written for The Guardian US, Curve Magazine, Passport Magazine, GO! Magazine, Brooklyn Papers, About.com, Shewired.com, Station-to-Station.com, Life of The Law, Lambda Literary Review, and blogs about mental illness/mental health. Her work has been anthologized in the classic queer anthology That’s Revolting: Queer Strategies for Resisting Assimilation, as well as Up All Night: Adventures in Lesbian Sex, Hot & Bothered: Short, Short Fiction on Lesbian Desire, volumes 3 & 4, Here Come the Brides: Reflections on Lesbian Love and Marriage, and Easy to Love, But Hard to Live With: Real People, Invisible Disabilities, True Stories. She is an activist working toward social and economic justice within an anti-racist framework and in the context of sexual and gender liberation. Stephanie graduated from Hunter College with a BA in communications, holds a JD from New York Law School, and has a special interest in creativity and mental illnesses as well as therapeutic jurisprudence. She is the author of the memoir Beautiful Wreck: Sex, Lies & Suicide.

The Book: Headcase is a proposed anthology to be comprised of 20-25 pieces: essays, poems, illustrations, photographs and/or other expressive mediums by writers/artists both established and new, exploring the themes of mental health, mental illness, and experiences of the mental health care systems by members of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) communities.

Not surprisingly, LGBTQ people have historically been pathologized on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity alone. Few traditional mental health programs and treatment modalities sensitive to and designed to meet the needs of LGBTQ psychiatrically disordered people exist. And not enough of our stories have been brought to light—not even to the LGBTQ community at large.

The anthology will include stories from a broad cross-section of the LGBTQ community, across boundaries of race, age, socioeconomic status, and ethnic identity. It is critical to examine the intersections among forms of oppression in framing issues of mental health and approaches to wellness.

We’re looking for a variety of material: First-person essays, secondhand observations and analytical pieces (if written in an accessible style). We are open to graphic essays/cartoons as well, and we’re eager to see ephemera: evocative photos, drawings, journal entries, and other documentation contributors consider useful.

Obviously, we’re looking for excellent writing–colorful, moving, funny, sad, surprising, difficult, insightful. Given the word limitation, it might be best to focus on a certain aspect of mental illness and mental health, and/or your particular experience—at least as an organizing principle.

Some general topics you might consider as a starting point:

  • Personal narratives that thread LGBTQ and mental health issues together
  • Various LGBTQ issues that can impact an individual’s mental health or emotional wellbeing
  • Experiences navigating the mental health care system(s) during gender transition
  • Cultural competence (of lack thereof) of mental health providers who have treated you
  • The impact of equality (or lack thereof) on mental health
  • Stories of the well-being of LGBTQ parents and children
  • Exploration of the impact of skin color, class and other privileges on mental health treatment
  • Family history of mental illness and your role/place within the family dynamic
  • Dating and mental illness
  • Institutionalization/incarceration
  • Misdiagnosis/mistreatment
  • Surviving psychiatric abuse
  • Experiences with attempted suicide, self-harm, etc.
  • Experience with pharmaceuticals, psychotherapy, ECT, or other treatments
  • Coming to terms with mental illness
  • Challenging traditional views of mental illness
  • Coming out as mentally ill in LGBTQ communities
  • Surviving conversion/reparative therapies

Deadline for submissions: TBD. As of late March 2015 this call has been available for about two months. We have a terrific shortlist in progress and we are still considering submissions. If you have a polished draft or a finished piece of art, send it our way; if you have an idea but have not yet begun your piece, it’s a good idea to email us a query before you plunge into writing or creating.

Please email inquiries and submissions to: headcasesubmissions@gmail.com, and include a brief biography so we get a sense of who you are and where your work has appeared. (It’s okay if you are looking to get published for the first time, too!)

Please be sure to include your name and contact info on any attachments you send.

We look forward to hearing from you!

~Teresa & Stephanie